Bobby and Howard's Family

Notes


Matches 5,251 to 5,284 of 5,284

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
5251 [NancyAnnNorman1034016.FTW] Sources; RC 386; Russell; AF. RC: Eystein, Earl of Throndheim, circa 710. Russell: Eisten Glumru, King of Trondheim, A.D. 780. AF gives dates--675-710. Throndheim, Earl, Throndheim Eystein of (I17282)
 
5252 [NancyAnnNorman1034016.FTW] Soure: RC 360. RC: Dame de Conde-sur-Noirau. NOTE: This generation added by ES in 1989 research. Conde-sur-Noirau, Mathilde de (I6259)
 
5253 [NancyAnnNorman1034016.FTW] Soure: RC 360. Seigneur de Saonnois. Living 1033-1026 (sic). NOTE: This generation added by ES in 1989 research. Belleme, Seigneur William de (I4065)
 
5254 [NancyAnnNorman1034016.FTW] THE GROTON AVERY CLAN, Vol. I, by Elroy McKendree Avery and CatherineHitchcock (Tilden) Avery, Cleveland, 1912. Found in the DAR Library, Washington DC. Page 314. Sanger, Lydia (I15537)
 
5255 [NancyAnnNorman1034016.FTW] THE GROTON AVERY CLAN, Vol. I, by Elroy McKendree Avery and CatherineHitchcock (Tilden) Avery, Cleveland, 1912. Found in the DAR Library, Washington DC. Page 314. Yale, Joseph (I20458)
 
5256 [NancyAnnNorman1034016.FTW] This from Simpson, either right off Ancestral file or her work. Problems with son Sisibert. My stuff has different mother for him and different spelling. King of France Dagobert I (do Not Merge) (I613)
 
5257 _MEDI: 10002 _TYPE: Collection Begun in 1935 by the Social Security Act signed into law by FDR, more than thirty million Americans were registered for the economic security sanctions by 1937. From 1937 to 1940, payments were made in one-lump sums amounts with the first amount being seventeen cents. Following amendments in 1939, the payments turned into monthly benefits and increased. Following further amendments in 1950, cost-of-living increases were awarded to those who were receiving benefits. From 1950 to the present, benefits have increased yearly in response to inflation concerning the costs of living. Source (S34)
 
5258 _MEDI: 10006 _TYPE: Collection Marriage certificates represent one of the key primary sources for family information, typically being issued the same day as a marriage takes place. In some cases, religious-based marriage documentsexist too, but the civil record of the marriage has always been required. Source (S205)
 
5259 _MEDI: 10018 _TYPE: Collection Death certificates represent one of the key primary sources for family information, typically being issued within days of a death and having many details about a persons' life. Frequently, they contain age, birthplace, parents' names and birthplaces and the cause of death. Source (S651)
 
5260 _MEDI: 10022 _TYPE: Collection United States Army involvement in World War II formally began with attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941. Germany, Italy, the Soviet Union, Japan, and China had already been fighting with the United Kingdom, France, and other forces as early as 1939 with the invasion by Germany into Poland.

With more than nine million American men and women involved in the European and Pacific conflicts, there is a high likelihood that a relative of someone searching today could have fought in World War II. These records lead to further information about the person, and to further records concerning pensions, and medical records.

After finding pertinent information for a veteran, requesting whatever military records are available is the next step to receiving pension records, medical records, and other personnel files. Due to a fire at the St. Louis facility in 1973, it is less likely to find military records between 1912 and 1959, but there are possibilities. In order to view original records at the facility is it highly recommended to make an appointment by calling the NPRC Archival Research Room in St. Louis, MO: 314-801-0850.

The following is from the National Personnel Records Center:
The National Personnel Records Center, Military Personnel Records (NPRC-MPR) is the repository of millions of military personnel, health, and medical records of discharged and deceased veterans of all services during the 20th century. (Records prior to WWI are in Washington, DC.) NPRC (MPR) also stores medical treatment records of retirees from all services, as well as records for dependent and other persons treated at naval medical facilities. Information from the records is made available upon written request (with signature and date) to the extent allowed by law.

This site is provided for those seeking information regarding military personnel, health and medical records stored at NPRC (MPR).

If you are a veteran or next-of-kin of a deceased veteran, you may now use vetrecs.archives.gov to order a copy of your military records. For all others, your request is best made using a Standard Form 180. It includes complete instructions for preparing and submitting requests. Please Note: All requests must be in writing, signed and mailed to us at the address shown below.

National Personnel Records Center Military Personnel Records 9700 Page Avenue St. Louis, MO 63132-5100

http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/military-personnel/index.html

National Archives and Records Administration. Office of Records Services - Washington, D.C. Modern Records Programs. Electronic and Special Media Records Services Division. Series from Record Group 64: Records of the National Archives and Records Administration. Although this series was created in 2002, it contains information from the period 1938 through 1946. The agency converted the Army Serial Number microfilm of computer punch cards to electronic form to support the military records reconstruction project. This file resulted from a subsequent project to prepare the records for use in the Access to Archival Databases project. 
Source (S656)
 
5261 _MEDI: 10024 _TYPE: Collection Bibliography: Naturalizations -- CA Southern. NARA M1524. Naturalization Petitions, Maryland. NARA M1640. Naturalization Index -- WWI Soldiers. NARA M1952. Naturalization Index -- NY Eastern. NARA M1164. Naturalizations -- MD. NARA M1168. Naturalizations -- MA. NARA M1368. Naturalizations -- PA Eastern. NARA M1522. Naturalizations -- PA Western. NARA M1537. Naturalization Index -- MA. NARA M1545. Naturalizations -- PA Middle. NARA M1626. Naturalization Index -- NYC Courts. NARA M1674. Naturalization Records of the U.S. Circuit Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, New Orleans Division: Petitions, 1838-1861. NARA P2233. Source (S635)
 
5262 _MEDI: 10025 _TYPE: Collection Explore your family history through news articles, community news, national news, local news, sports news, current news, classified ads and historical data without the hassle of manually sorting through mounds of papers via the public library can benefit from this huge online archive provided by Newspaper Archive Source (S257)
 
5263 _MEDI: 10053 _TYPE: Collection We undertook the arduous task of deciphering the handwritten pages of the 1940 Census to create a searchable index for the census. This was accomplished gradually, state by state, as we covered more and more of the census.

As required by the US Constitution, the census is a federal mandate to count every resident of the United States of America every 10 years. Census data is released to the public 72 years after it was taken.

Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S35)
 
5264 _MEDI: 10069 _TYPE: Collection This Divorce Index is a compilation of the Reports of Divorce Decrees or Annulment to Marriage by the district clerk's office in the county where the court decree was filed. Index information includes husband and wife names, ages, number of children, date of marriage, date of divorce, and the county where the divorce occurred.

Reports of divorces and annulments only were reported to the Bureau of Vital Statistics starting in 1968. Before that time, check the county clerk for earlier records. Ongoing corrections are made to the original records; therefore these indexes may not reflect the most recent information. To receive information on divorces prior to 1971, or if you cannot locate a divorce in this index, you must contact the District Clerks' office in which the divorce occurred.

Next steps: The next steps for this database depend upon the motives behind looking at it to begin. A divorce proves that a marriage took place, and may be able to help establish possible parentage, although without DNA testing or a written statement, it cannot establish it alone. Divorces also help lead to other people who may know something about relatives that otherwise may go undiscovered or be completely forgotten.

Source: Texas, Department of State Health Records. 
Source (S177)
 
5265 _MEDI: 10071 _TYPE: Collection Death certificates represent one of the key primary sources for family information, typically being issued within days of a death and having many details about a persons' life. Frequently, they contain age, birthplace, parents' names and birthplaces and the cause of death. Source (S434)
 
5266 _MEDI: 10081 _TYPE: Collection Death certificates represent one of the key primary sources for family information, typically being issued within days of a death and having many details about a persons' life. Frequently, they contain age, birthplace, parents' names and birthplaces and the cause of death. Source (S338)
 
5267 _MEDI: 10109 _TYPE: Collection www.wikitree.com Source (S633)
 
5268 _MEDI: 10127 _TYPE: Collection Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S167)
 
5269 _MEDI: 10128 _TYPE: Collection The 1870 Census was the first census to provide detailed information on the black population, only years after the culmination of the Civil War when slaves were granted freedom. The 1870 Census’ population estimate is controversial, as many believed it underestimated the true population numbers, especially in New York and Pennsylvania.

Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S405)
 
5270 _MEDI: 10129 _TYPE: Collection The 1880 census contains records of families living in the United States and its territories during the latter half of the Great Westward Migration. Thirty-eight states were included in the 1880 census, plus the territories of: Arizona, Dakota, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Non-organized Alaska was also enumerated, but the "Indian Territory" (now Oklahoma) was not enumerated for non-Indians.

Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S406)
 
5271 _MEDI: 10131 _TYPE: Collection Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S43)
 
5272 _MEDI: 10132 _TYPE: Collection Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S170)
 
5273 _MEDI: 10133 _TYPE: Collection Federal census takers were asked to record information about every person who was in each household on the census day. A census taker might have visited a house on a later date, but the information he collected was supposed to be about the people who were in the house on the census day. The basic census enumeration unit was the county. Each county was divided into enumeration districts, one for each enumerator. The completed forms were sent to the Commerce Department’s Census Office in Washington, D.C.

Federal censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified. 
Source (S33)
 
5274 _MEDI: 10134 _TYPE: Collection The 1930 Census determined the population of the United States to be 122,775,046. This is an increase of almost 16 percent over the 1920 Census, which reported a population of 106,021,537. This was the 15th decennial census conducted in the United States under authority granted by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution. It was conducted in April 1930, except in Alaska, where it was conducted in late 1929. Until 2012 the 1930 Census is the latest available to the public, due to 72-year privacy laws. It is based on actual counts of persons living in residential structures. Source (S140)
 
5275 _MEDI: 10147 _TYPE: Collection www.billiongraves.com Source (S203)
 
5276 _MEDI: 10220 _TYPE: Collection Birth information may be included for those residents born primarily between 1900 and 1990. The original sources are not available. Source (S18)
 
5277 _MEDI: 10450 _TYPE: Collection Source (S708)
 
5278 _MEDI: 280315941-2 _TYPE: Smart Matching MyHeritage.com family tree Family site: Nye Family Site (23andMe) Family tree: Family tree Source (S613)
 
5279 _MEDI: 30010 _TYPE: Collection This collection includes searchable index data for marriage returns and licenses from all of the counties in Indiana except the following: Scott, Shelby, Spencer, Starke, Switzerland, Tipton, and Vermillion. This collection is 82% complete. Additional records will be added as they are completed. Some images cannot be viewed online, at this time, due to various contract issues. Images are being added as they become available. Source (S154)
 
5280 _MEDI: 30192 _TYPE: Collection Source (S139)
 
5281 _MEDI: 30244 _TYPE: Collection Not all indexed names will have a viewable record image due to contractual agreements. Source (S629)
 
5282 _MEDI: 40000 _TYPE: Collection The Geni World Family Tree is found on www.Geni.com. Geni is owned and operated by MyHeritage. Source (S3)
 
5283 _MEDI: 40001 _TYPE: Collection The FamilySearch Family Tree is published by MyHeritage under license from FamilySearch International, the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church). Source (S334)
 
5284 _MEDI: 90100 _TYPE: Collection Source (S317)
 

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